Crochet Babywearing Cover Tutorial

Babywearing Cover
When I was carrying my girls in slings, I tended to improvise with covers such as a toddler sized waterproof coat with the sleeves tucked around the sling.

It’s only more recently, when making for others, that I have looked at other options. I’ve sewn some from water resistant fabric and have crocheted others, but the principle is the same: a piece of fabric that helps fill the gap in your coat and keeps baby snug and/or dry but not too warm.

If you would prefer to sew, then this (Dutch but with good photos) tutorial may be helpful for a shaped panel with zips, or you can follow the same principles as the crochet method, using the fabrics of your choice with zips, buttons or poppers.

The simplest version, as explained here, is a rectangle for the body section, with an optional hood, also made from a rectangle. This works best with a coat that you can sew buttons into, so may not work well with a waterproof jacket unless it has a fleece lining.

First of all, you need to work out the main panel size, ideally with your baby in the sling, or like me you can use a doll and a dressmaker’s duummy.

Height:  measure from the nape of baby’s neck to hem of coat (58cm in this example)

Width: measure across the widest part of the space between coat edges, and add to that some overlap on each side (I’d suggest adding at least 5cm total)

For the hood, I worked with the same width as the main panel (42cm), and a height of 26cm.

 

Any yarn and hook can be used for this. Something washable may be helpful, or you could use pure wool  (not superwash) and lanolise it to help with weatherproofing. I have used a 5mm hook and Cygnet Grousemoor Aran here, a washable, well priced yarn with a bit of stretchiness.

 

Main panel: with a hook 0.5mm larger than for the rest of the project (unless you work a loose chain), work a chain to the height of the panel, plus three chains.

Switch to main hook.

Row 1: chain 3, work 1 treble (US dc) into 4th chain from the hook and each subsequent stitch turn work.

Row 2- end: chain 3, work 1tr (USdc) into the next and each subsequent stitch, including the turning chain in subsequent rows; turn work.

Continue in this way until the width of your panel matches the measurement you took. Break the yarn and weave in ends.

Hood: worked widthways,

Leave a long yarn tail (approx 60cm), then work a chain to the hood width plus 3 chains,

Row 1: Work 1 treble (US dc) into the 4th chain from the hook and each subsequent stitch; turn work,

Row 2- end: chain 3, work 1tr (USdc) into the next and each subsequent stitch, including the turning chain in subsequent rows; turn work.

Continue in this way until the width of your panel matches the desired hood height. Fasten off but do not break the yarn.

With the larger hook, work a chain

 

With right sides together, fold the hood in half, short side to short side, and slip stitch two of the free edges togther, from where the yarn is attached towards the fold, to make the seam at the top of the hood; finish off, break the yarn and weave the end in.Folded hood with text

Fasten off and break the yarn, then weave in the end.

Turn the hood so that the right sides are facing out, then fold it again and mark the centre point of the long side with a stitch marker, a piece of contrasting yarn or a safety pin. Odd earrings work well too!

Fold the main panel in half, along its length, and mark the centre point in the same way.

Align both pieces and hold the centre marks together with a marker, safety pin or a loose stitch

Stitch marker for join Holding the two pieces, edges aligned and wrong sides together, and using the yarn tail on the hood, slip stitch 11 stitches along the hood edge only, then start to slip stitch the two pieces together along the neck edge, working into the foundation chain on the hood and the ends of the rows on the main panel. Continue with the seam until you are 11 stitches from the end of the hood edge, finish off, break the yarn and weave in the yarn end.

You can then decide how to attach the panel to your coat. The simplest way is to find some buttons that will fit through the gaps in the treble stitches, and to sew them to the inside of your coat. Giant press studs could also be used, or tape with press studs attached to it.

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One thought on “Crochet Babywearing Cover Tutorial

  1. Brilliant idea, working retail I often see ladies carrying their babies on cold winter’s day with the baby’s legs showing bare (purple from cold) skin.

    Could even add press studed bands that go through belt loops so that one isn’t reliant on wearing a coat on days that are more cooler for baby than Mum. Or a strap that ties in the back like an apron

    Liked by 1 person

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